OUT: Former NSSF Deputy Managing Director Geraldine Busuulwa Ssali

An anonymous person has written to the Inspector General of Government (IGG) Irene Mulyagonja Kakooza, saying the NSSF Deputy Managing Director Geraldine Ssali Busuulwa, is not fit to hold the office.

In the communication, ‘Mrs Geraldine Ssali Busuulwa is not fit to be NSSF Deputy Managing Director’ dated May 20 and received by the IGG’s office on May 30, the whistleblower, that says has worked with the NSSF for more than years, makes a litany of accusations against Ms Ssali, among them ‘misconduct and insubordination’.

IGG Irene Mulyagonja Kakooza
IGG Irene Mulyagonja Kakooza

Giving a detailed narrative of the requisite qualifications including the job description for the NSSF Deputy MD, the whistleblower says Ms Ssali had breached her duty as prescribed, by failing ‘to provide leadership to the Fund’.

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As a responsible staff member, I am required by the Fund’s Code of Ethics to bring to the attention of management the conduct and actions of Ms Ssali that I consider unethical or unlawful conduct,’ the whistleblower wrote in a four-page communication addressed to among others the Office of the President/State House; the Minister of Finance, Planning and Economic Development; the Executive Director of the Uganda Retirement Benefits Regulatory Authority (URBRA); the Attorney General and to the Board Chairman and Managing Director of NSSF, respectively.

The whistleblower also expresses reservations as to whether Ms Ssali, who formerly worked as Head of the Directorate of Management in Her Majesty’s Treasury in the United Kingdom, is capable of meeting the job obligations of the multi-trillion shilling NSSF, an institution the whistleblower says, has over one million members.

‘For a person to qualify for that position, they must possess at leat 10 years working experience at a Head of Directorate level in a large financial services related organization. In addition, prior experience in managing large and complex business organisations with a big workforce whose skills are diverse; familiarity with the current global and local regulatory environment for investment funds as well as a demonstrated ability to on top of the developments in the pension sector globally are desirable. All those she didn’t have. For that matter, she lied about her track record and experience,’ the whistleblower writes.

The whistleblower adds: Therefore, Mrs Ssali misled the appointing authority, for this case the Minister of Finance, Planning and Economic Development’.

Ms Ssali is also accused of professional misconduct for allegedly leaking ‘vital information to the media on the running of the Fund, a thing that contravenes the ethical code required of all employees of the Fund’.

Further, the whistleblower takes a jibe at Ms Ssali for suing the Fund for Shs2.5 billion ‘for her personal gain’, and for neglecting advice by the finance minister to drop the suits.

‘How can a top manager who is responsible for the savers money be the very one demanding for over Shs2.5 billion,; does she care for the organization and most importantly the savers’ money or is she here for only personal gain,’? the whistleblower wonders.