Calls for Political Co-existence: NRM's Richard Todwong

The Deputy Secretary General of the  ruling National Resistance Movement (NRM) Richard Todwong has accused party colleagues and senior civil servants for abetting runaway corruption and tribalism.

Mr Todwong, who is number three in the party structures, says these are some of the reasons the NRM party will fall out of power and crash completely.

“I’m saying this because I know and I have to be honest because my church told me to be honest. I have told this to the President. If we don’t control our greed and how we use public resources, then Ugandans will push us out of power,” Todwong, whose party has been in power for 30 years, said in an address.

He added: “We need to manage greed and during the debate of transition, those in positions of leadership might want to collect as much as they can because it’s their last chance in power.”

Mr. Todwong also expressed disappointment with religious leaders, saying they had paid little attention to the need for citizens’ participation in the proposed national dialogue to be launched later this year.

This followed a meeting by the Inter-religious Council of Uganda hosted in Entebbe to explore actions and strategies needed to fast-track the talks’ process.

The seemingly frustrated Deputy Secretary General urged religious leaders not politicize the process, stressing that it should be geared towards a peaceful transition of power.

The IRCU is a body that brings together various religious groups in the country and they have always showed interest in advising on how the country should be governed especially on peacefully transition of power, which they stress, has never happened since Independence in 1962.

However, President Museveni has always warned the religious leaders against commenting on politics.

Meanwhile, the former Forum for Democratic Change (FDC) President Mugisha Muntu wants the proposed dialogue to focus on finding lasting solutions to Uganda’s possible problems.
“There must be leaders who can start building credibility and trust in our population. What holds Ugandans together is hope,” he said.