Librat Mfumukeko

The African Council of Religious Leaders (ACRL) has expressed its disappointment over the conduct and behaviour of the East African Community (EAC) Secretary General, Ambassador Librat Mfumukeko.

Mfumukeko locked himself in his office and declined to meet a delegation of the religious leaders despite officially inviting them for a meeting.

The council was led by its Co-Chair His Eminence Sheikh Shaban Mubaje, the Mufti of Uganda and other religious leaders from Burundi, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda and Uganda together with ACRL staff.

The council had been invited to present a paper on: ‘Political Democratization in East Africa: Progress and Pitfalls 1990 -2020’. The Paper had been shared in advance and to update the EAC on its other regional peace activities including the campaign to lobby African states to sign and ratify the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW).

“This is most embarrassing and quite unprofessional. How does the EAC (Secretariat) expect the members and citizens from the region to engage with its processes if this is the kind of treatment the Secretary General shows to invited guests! This is completely un-African and quite abnormal” Sheikh Mubaje wondered.

The team, that was kept waiting from 9.30 am to 2pm at the EAC Headquarters reception area, had to abandon its mission to meet the SG of the regional body.

“Religious leaders condemn this act of impunity by Mfumukeko. We will definitely write a complaint letter to the Chairman of the EAC, His Excellency President Paul Kagame and the member states to protest this mistreatment and lack of respect,” said Dr Francis Kuria, Secretary General, of the council.

The leaders ­insisted they will not shirk or be discouraged from their moral obligation to engage in regional peace and integration issues particularly partnering with member states through the EAC despite the mistreatment.

The peaceful co-existence of over 150 Million citizens from the East Africa Region requires an inclusive Mfumukeko betrays this trust from faith communities.