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Makerere University lecturer to premiere her documentary film in Ugandan Cinema

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Tuko Pamoja (We Are One), a docuseries by Evelyn Cindy Magara (PhD) and Nyati Motion Pictures, goes to cinemas with 13 premieres starting from February to June 2024. The Tuko Pamoja documentary film (series) is about Uganda’s heroes and unity in diversity.

Written by Rogers Atukunda and directed by Dr. Magara, a Lecturer of Film and Literature at Makerere University, the film explores the unifying geopolitical and geolinguistics of 1870–1900 Uganda and the historical relationships between the peoples of the Great Lakes Region.

The segments that shall have independent premieres include Bunyoro-Kitara, Buganda, Busoga, Tooro, Ankole, Kigezi, Breakaway Kingdoms, The Luo, The Ateker, The Peoples of Rwenzori, The Peoples of Eastern Uganda, West Nile, and finally Uganda: The Making of a Nation.

Nyati Motion Pictures, a Ugandan film production company that started operating in 2006, is renowned for films such as Fate (2006), Fair Play (2010), Windows of Hope (2011), A Book for Every Child (2012), and many others. Nyati is also known for breaking ground; for instance, it produced Uganda’s first independent professional film, FATE, which was the first Ugandan film to screen at Cineplex and on DStv’s African Magic in 2007. Currently, Nyati is working on a very large project that will bring Uganda’s history on screen.

“This film aims to foster cohesion since our pre-colonial history shows that we are one” (Tuko Pamoja) and our different tribes (nations) were geographical emblems that should continue to define but not divide us. This is because our pre-colonial history shows that Uganda already existed in terms of politics and language; the people continue to propagate the division seed sown by colonialists,” said Director Dr. Cindy Magara.

“The colonialists wanted to see us divided on, for example, tribal lines, to subjugate us. When we all know this history, it will reduce ethnic tensions,” she added.

According to Dr. Magara, the story is relevant to contemporary East Africa as the region struggles to foster unity through a confederation of states such as the East African Community and Africa Union.

“By retracing the historical footsteps of Omukama Kabaleega of Bunyoro-Kitara Kingdom, King Mwanga of Buganda Kingdom, Chief Awich of Payira, and Queen Muhumuza of Kigezi, etc., as some of the major players, especially in the resistance against British imperialism from 1870s to 1900, we learn about the origin of the people of Uganda and the nations (kingdoms) they belonged to that later morphed into Uganda.”

She went on: “The film tackles key issues the continent is grappling with, including democracy, neo-colonialism, integration, peace, and stability.”

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