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Ugandans demand for global treaty to address plastic pollution

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Simon Kabayo
Simon Kabayohttps://eagle.co.ug
Reporter whose work is detailed

A recent survey conducted by Ipsos, commissioned by WWF and the Plastic Free Foundation, reveals that an overwhelming majority of Ugandans support a global treaty to address plastic pollution. The survey, which polled 24,727 respondents in 32 countries, including Uganda, found that almost all Ugandan participants (97%) support specific rules to ensure accountability and action against single-use plastics.

The survey found that 97% of Ugandan participants believe it’s important to reduce global plastic production, a crucial step in mitigating the harmful effects of plastic pollution on the environment and human health. This overwhelming support indicates a strong desire among Ugandans to address the plastic pollution crisis, which has severe consequences on the country’s waterways, soil, and wildlife.

Furthermore, 96% of Ugandan participants believe it’s important to ban chemicals used in plastic that are hazardous to human health, wildlife, and the environment. This finding highlights the urgent need to address the harmful impact of plastic chemicals on human health and the environment.

Additionally, 93% of Ugandan participants believe it’s important to ban unnecessary single-use plastic products most likely to become plastic pollution. Single-use plastics, such as plastic bags, straws, and water bottles, are a significant contributor to plastic pollution, and banning them would significantly reduce the amount of plastic waste that ends up in the environment.

The survey also found that 96% of Ugandan participants believe it’s important to ban types of plastic that cannot be easily recycled in practice. This finding underscores the need for a more sustainable approach to plastic production and consumption, one that prioritizes recyclable and biodegradable materials.

Moreover, 96% of Ugandan participants believe it’s important to require transparent labeling on plastic products, indicating a strong desire for accountability and transparency in the plastic industry.

A significant 97% of Ugandan participants believe it’s important to require manufacturers and retailers to provide reuse and refill systems, a crucial step in reducing plastic waste and promoting sustainable consumption.

Furthermore, 93% of Ugandan participants believe it’s important to require all plastic manufacturers to pay fees that cover the costs of reuse, recycling, and safe management of plastic waste.

Moreover, 89% of Ugandan participants agree that a global treaty should include rules that ensure all participating countries have access to funding, technology, and other resources to comply with the rules, significantly higher than the global average.

The survey report was released on Tuesday, May 28, at Skyz Hotel Naguru, and was attended by policymakers, civil society, and other stakeholders. The findings demonstrate that Ugandans are willing to take action to combat plastic pollution and support global efforts to reduce plastic waste. The survey’s results serve as a call to action for policymakers, manufacturers, and consumers to work together to address the plastic pollution crisis and create a more sustainable future.

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